PowerShell license tips

Well as I know many users are trying to find Windows key with some key viewer software. Nothing wrong, but this software is not always “nice” and can do something else than just show you a key. Of course, with Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 you have many times a key in BIOS, so there is no need to search for it.
Anyway, if you feel better when you have a key printed on a piece of paper, you can do that simply with one PowerShell cmdlet:

Get-WmiObject -query ‘select * from SoftwareLicensingService’

This will show you more than only a key. There are a lot of information on licensing, like KMS server, OS version, … In some cases it can be useful.

Windows ADK on Server 2016 – Unsigned driver?

If anyone tries to install the new Microsoft ADK (for Windows 10 Version 1703 – 10.1.15063) on Windows server 2016, you receive the error that a driver is not digitally signed. Well, Microsoft drivers are not signed? Something is wrong…
Actually, according to this post, they really have a problem and there is a workaround with disabling the secure boot. But this is not recommended and is not aligned with best practices – so you don’t want to do it.
Anyway, this is the only way you can install ADK on server 2016 and I did it. I have removed the previous (broken) installation, disabled Secure boot and reinstalled ADK. After a successful installation, I reenabled Secure boot and things still went wrong. I was unable to mount ADK boot image (to use in SCCM or MDT). Well, in this post it is explained another workaround (yes, I know…). Set the registry as is explained and it should work. I just hope that all other functionalities in ADK now are working OK.

WannaCrypt Malware

Of course you have heard about the new malware, which yesterday created a lot of problems in industry. Unfortunately it is not an unknown problem.
Microsoft released a patch for this type of vulnerability already in March, but it seems once again that administrators are not patching their systems.
So, if you haven’t patched your systems at least every month, if you haven’t patched your system from March, is time to do it. And don’t forget to have a good defense system (antivirus and other prevention mechanisms). Update them to!
You can find additional information in this link.

Here is a link to post how was neutralized and who did this.
Anyway, we have already a version 2.0; you can read about this version here.
Again, please patch your systems! This update will solve a vulnerability. And don’t forget: this is not the first malware who was written on known vulnerability – patch your systems constantly!
Additionally, please disable SMB1 protocol – it is not new that it is not secure. Here and here are some guidelines how to do it via GPO.

Migrating Enterprise CA to new server (Part 1)

This will be a step by step process to migrate Active Directory Certificate Services from one server to another in same domain. It is a case when you upgrade or change your server where CA is installed.
You have to know some basic things before you begin to migrate a CA server:

  • It is recommended that the new server has the same name as old one – this because we have CRL and other paths in certificates. If this name is not accessible, we can’t control the validity of the certificate.
  • This is not a migration from one server to another; we have to export all settings and backups from the old server, demount it and after this install the new one with the same name. Errors and mistakes are not allowed.
  • Do the migration slowly, take your time, document everything. You will need all the documentation during the migration and supporting period.
  • In this guide, you will find steps to migrate one server. If you have a more complicated environment with more servers and subordinary CAs, then you need plans for migration of the entire migration before you start the migration.

Source server
First take full backup of the entire server. This step is non mandatory, but you may need it if something goes wrong.

After this check and write down the server name, IP address (if is static), paths where CA database and CRL are located. You will need this data to restore the same configuration on the new server.

Now, the crucial step is to make a backup of all certificates, certificate templates, settings, databases, root CA and registry settings. Unfortunately, CA backup does not care about all settings – it will backup only the CA database. Steps that are required to be able to transfer the entire configuration are:

  • Check all the roles that are installed (CA, CA Web enrolment…) because you will need to install the same roles on the destination server.
  • In MMC (mmc.exe) open the Certificate Authority snap in and take a screenshot or write down the names of certificate templates you are using. When you will install the new server, you will have to enable same templates. You can export all certificate template names also with command certutil.exe –catemplates > D:\Backup\catemplates.txt from administrative Command prompt. This step is required only if you are using enterprise CA.

  • Now, that we have the CA opened in MMC, we can also use it to backup CA database. To do this right click on CA server name, go to All tasks and select Back up CA. Follow the wizard and be careful that you select Private key and CA certificate and Certificate database and certificate database log check boxes. Only in this way you will backup all data that we need.
  • Record your CAs CSP and signature algorithm. This can be done by executing command certutil.exe –getreg ca\csp\* > d:\Backup\csp.txt from administrative Command prompt. There will be nothing to do later if you are using default algorithms, but is always better to check.

  • Export the registry keys: on destination server you will need to have the same settings as you had on source, so you need to export registry separately because this is not a part of CA backup procedure. Open Regedit.exe and navigate to HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\CertSvc\Configuration. Right click to key and save it to file.

  • If you are using custum policy, you should include it into backup. This means that you have to copy the file CAPolicy.inf that is located in C:\Windows (System root folder).
  • Review all steps to check if they are done correctly!
  • Using server manager remove CA roles from the server and restart the server.
  • Remove server from domain, restart it and at the end turn it off. If you have other roles on the same server, you also have to move them on other servers. From this point your old server is down – you don’t need it anymore.

Export and import DHCP settings with netsh

Sometimes you will have to transfer DHCP settings via netsh command. This could be useful for a couple of reasons and it is fine to know how to approach it. Anyway, this is the quickest way to do a DHCP migration.
First you have to login to source server (it could be also a failover clustered DHCP service) and open CMD as Administrator. Then you have to enter in netsh mode with typing:
netsh
Now you have to select server with typing:
dns server \\servername
Where servername is the name of the old DHCP server or clustered service name. This will connect you to DHCP server and you are ready to export settings with this command:
export filename all        to export the entire configuration or
export filename 192.168.222.0    to export only a scope configuration (in my case 192.168.222.0)
Of course, you have to replace the filename with full path and name of the file where you want to save exported data. This file now must be transferred to target – new server and we are ready to import the configuration. Of course, priory you import the configuration, the new server has to be authorized in AD. To begin an import procedure, we have to do the same steps as on the old server; open command prompt, enter into netsh mode and select DHCP server. After this, we have just a step to import settings with this command:
Import filename all        to import all settings or
Import filename 192.168.222.0    to import just a scope
That’s all. Just be sure to double-check if the import did its job, disable and unautorize the old server (you can do it also with netsh: netsh dhcp delete server ServerIP). Of course, don’t forget to uninstall the service on the old computer.
You have finished. Good work!